Side Effects Of Estradiol

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Side Effects Of Estradiol
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Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction to estradiol: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Estradiol

Generic name: estradiol oral [ ess-tra-DYE-ole ]
Brand names: Estrace, Vivelle-Dot, Vivelle, Delestrogen, DepoEstradiol, . show all 17 brands Divigel, Elestrin, Alora, Estraderm, Estradot, Estrasorb, Estrogel, Evamist, Femtrace, Menostar, Minivelle, Climara
Drug class: Estrogens

Medically reviewed by Kaci Durbin, MD. Last updated on Feb 21, 2022.

What is estradiol?

Estradiol is a form of estrogen, a female sex hormone that regulates many processes in the body. It is available as an oral tablet, a topical gel or patch, vaginal cream, or as an injection.

Estradiol is used to treat menopause symptoms such as hot flashes and vaginal changes, and to prevent osteoporosis (bone loss) in menopausal women. Estradiol is also used to treat low estrogen levels in women with ovarian failure. It is also indicated to treat certain types of breast cancer and prostate cancer.

Estradiol may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

Warnings

You should not use estradiol if you have: undiagnosed vaginal bleeding, liver disease, a bleeding disorder, or if you have ever had a heart attack, a stroke, a blood clot, or cancer of the breast, uterus/cervix, or vagina.

Do not use estradiol if you are pregnant.

Estradiol may increase your risk of developing uterine cancer. Report any unusual vaginal bleeding right away.

Using this medicine can increase your risk of blood clots, stroke, or heart attack, or cancer of the breast, uterus, or ovaries. Estradiol should not be used to prevent heart disease, stroke, or dementia.

Have regular physical exams and mammograms, and self-examine your breasts for lumps on a monthly basis while using this medicine.

Related/similar drugs

Before taking this medicine

You should not use this medicine if you are allergic to estradiol, or if you have:

  • unusual vaginal bleeding that has not been checked by a doctor;
  • liver disease;
  • a history of heart attack, stroke, or blood clot;
  • an increased risk of having blood clots due to a heart problem or a hereditary blood disorder; or
  • a history of hormone-related cancer, or cancer of the breast, uterus/cervix, or vagina.

Do not use estradiol if you are pregnant. Tell your doctor right away if you become pregnant during treatment.

Using this medicine can increase your risk of blood clots, stroke, or heart attack. You are even more at risk if you have high blood pressure, diabetes, high cholesterol, if you are overweight, or if you smoke.

Estradiol should not be used to prevent heart disease, stroke, or dementia, because this medicine may actually increase your risk of developing these conditions.

To make sure this medicine is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have ever had:

  • heart disease;
  • liver problems, or prior jaundice caused by pregnancy or taking hormones;
  • kidney disease;
  • cancer;
  • gallbladder disease;
  • asthma;
  • epilepsy or other seizure disorder;
  • migraines;
  • lupus;
  • endometriosis or uterine fibroid tumors;
  • hereditary angioedema;
  • porphyria (a genetic enzyme disorder that causes symptoms affecting the skin or nervous system);
  • a thyroid disorder; or
  • high levels of calcium in your blood.

Using estradiol may increase your risk of cancer of the breast, uterus, or ovaries. Talk with your doctor about this risk.

Estradiol lowers the hormone needed to produce breast milk and can slow breast milk production. Tell your doctor if you are breast-feeding.

How should I take estradiol?

Take estradiol exactly as it was prescribed for you. Follow all directions on your prescription label. Do not take this medicine in larger amounts or for longer than recommended.

Estradiol may increase your risk of developing uterine cancer. To help lower this risk, your doctor may also want you to take a progestin. Report any unusual vaginal bleeding to your doctor immediately.

Your doctor should check your progress on a regular basis (every 3 to 6 months) to determine whether you should continue this treatment. Self-examine your breasts for lumps on a monthly basis and have a mammogram every year while using estradiol.

If you need major surgery or will be on long-term bed rest, you may need to stop using this medicine for a short time. Any doctor or surgeon who treats you should know that you are using this medicine.

Store at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light. Keep the bottle tightly closed when not in use.

If you are taking injectable estrogen, dispose of any needles and syringes in an appropriate sharps container per your state laws. Do not throw away used needles into the garbage.

If you are using estradiol spray, avoid fire, flame, or smoking until the spray has dried. Do not apply lotion or sunscreen over the area for at least one hour.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222. Overdose can result in nausea, vomiting and vaginal bleeding.

What to avoid

Avoid smoking. It can greatly increase your risk of blood clots, stroke, or heart attack while using this medicine.

Grapefruit and grapefruit juice may interact with estradiol and lead to unwanted side effects. Avoid the use of grapefruit products.

Estradiol side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction to estradiol: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor at once if you have:

  • heart attack symptoms – chest pain or pressure, pain spreading to your jaw or shoulder, nausea, sweating;
  • signs of a stroke – sudden numbness or weakness (especially on one side of the body), sudden severe headache, slurred speech, problems with vision or balance;
  • signs of a blood clot – sudden vision loss, stabbing chest pain, feeling short of breath, coughing up blood, pain or warmth in one or both legs;
  • swelling or tenderness in your stomach;
  • jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes);
  • memory problems, confusion, unusual behavior;
  • unusual vaginal bleeding, pelvic pain;
  • a lump in your breast; or
  • nausea, vomiting, constipation, increased thirst or urination, muscle weakness, bone pain, lack of energy.

Common estradiol side effects may include:

  • nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, stomach cramps;
  • mood changes, sleep problems (insomnia);
  • cold symptoms such as stuffy nose, sinus pain, sore throat;
  • weight gain;
  • headache, back pain, dizziness;
  • breast pain;
  • darkening of the skin or skin rash;
  • thinning scalp hair; or
  • vaginal itching or discharge, changes in your menstrual periods, breakthrough bleeding.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect estradiol?

Sometimes it is not safe to use certain medications at the same time. Some drugs can affect your blood levels of other drugs you take, which may increase side effects or make the medications less effective.

Many drugs can interact with estradiol. This includes prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Not all possible interactions are listed in this medication guide. Tell your doctor about all your current medicines and any medicine you start or stop using.

Where can I get more information?

Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use estradiol only for the indication prescribed.

More about estradiol

  • Check interactions
  • Compare alternatives
  • Pricing & coupons
  • Reviews (524)
  • Drug images
  • Side effects
  • Dosage information
  • Patient tips
  • During pregnancy
  • Support group
  • Drug class: estrogens
  • Breastfeeding

Patient resources

  • Advanced Reading
  • Estradiol Vaginal (Advanced Reading)
  • Estradiol Oral Tablets
  • Estradiol Gel (Divigel)
  • Estradiol Gel (Elestrin)

Other brands

Professional resources

Related treatment guides

  • Atrophic Vaginitis
  • Gender Affirming Hormone Therapy
  • Atrophic Urethritis
  • Breast Cancer, Palliative

Further information

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

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Estradiol side effects and how to avoid them

Estradiol side effects and how to avoid them

There are many estradiol side effects, which can vary by the form of estradiol you use. Compare common vs. serious side effects here and find out how long they last.

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By SingleCare Team | Nov. 24, 2021 Medically reviewed by Anne Jacobson, MD, MPH

Estradiol is the strongest of three forms of estrogen naturally produced by the female body. These also include estrone (E1) and estriol (E3) , which are hormones that bind to the body’s estrogen receptors. Both estradiol and estriol can be used as hormone replacement therapy in postmenopausal women, but estradiol is far more commonly used. Estriol is only available in compounded drugs that are not FDA approved.

Estradiol (E2) is a generic prescription medication used as hormone therapy to treat symptoms of menopause such as night sweats , skin flushing, hot flashes, and vaginal dryness, inflammation, and thinning. These effects are caused by decreased estrogen levels in the body and taking estradiol helps increase the hormone and help with symptoms.

Estradiol is also an ingredient in certain low-dose birth control pills that are prescribed to some women during perimenopause . Estradiol may be prescribed to prevent osteoporosis and to treat menopausal migraine and postpartum depression. It is sometimes used in palliative care for certain breast and prostate cancers .

Estradiol is available as a tablet, transdermal patch, cream, or vaginal ring. There are many Estradiol brand names, including Alora , Estrogel , Vagifem , Climara , and Estrace .

When taking any medication, it’s important to weigh the benefits and risks. Consider the following estradiol side effects, warnings, and interactions.

Common side effects of estradiol

Most common side effects of estradiol improve within three months. When taking estradiol, the most common side effects include:

  • A skin reaction at the site of patch or cream application
  • Vaginal spotting or breakthrough bleeding
  • Dysmenorrhea, or painful periods
  • Breast tenderness or breast pain
  • Musculoskeletal pain including back pain
  • Stomach cramps, bloating, or indigestion
  • Flu-like symptoms
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Diarrhea or constipation
  • Vaginal discharge or itching
  • Headache or migraine
  • Fluid retention and bloating
  • Increased blood pressure
  • Trouble sleeping
  • Changes in mood
  • Vaginal yeast infection
  • Increased blood sugar
  • Weight changes
  • Changes to sex drive
  • Changes in hair growth, including hair loss on the scalp and excess hair growth on the face, chest, or back
  • Vision changes or problems with contact lenses
  • Skin rash
  • Melasma (chloasma), brown patches on the face
  • Nipple discharge
  • Expulsion of the vaginal ring
  • Breast development may occur in pediatric patients using the cream version

Serious side effects of estradiol

Though serious side effects are not common when taking estradiol, the following may occur:

  • Blood clots in the legs or in the lungs
  • Blood clot in the retina of the eye
  • Chest pain and heart attack
  • Stroke
  • High blood pressure
  • Increased risk of cancer in the breast, ovary, and uterus
  • Endometrial hyperplasia, a thickening of the uterine lining. Another kind of hormone called a progestin may be prescribed together with estradiol to prevent this.
  • Growth of uterine fibroids
  • Dangerously high blood calcium levels in people with metastatic breast cancer
  • Jaundice
  • Gallbladder disease
  • Pancreatitis
  • Growth of non-cancerous liver tumors that can bleed
  • Depression
  • Dementia
  • Severe headache or migraine
  • Worsening of movement disorders
  • Worsening of seizures
  • Worsening of asthma
  • Worsening of an enzyme condition, porphyria
  • Lupus flares
  • Severe allergic reactions
  • Erythema multiforme—bulls-eye shaped skin lesions—or erythema nodosum—painful and tender bumps beneath the skin
  • Ischemic colitis, large intestine injury caused by decreased blood flow
  • Intestinal obstruction may occur with the vaginal ring
  • Vaginal erosion or ulcer may occur when using the vaginal ring
  • Toxic shock syndrome may occur when using the vaginal ring

Estradiol gel vs. cream vs. patch vs. ring side effects

The estradiol patch is applied once or twice a week to a clean, dry area of skin on the abdomen or buttocks. The gel is applied daily to the arm. Estradiol cream is inserted directly into the vagina one to three times a week for up to three weeks of each month. The vaginal ring is inserted in the vagina every 90 days. Skin reactions are more common with the patch (most commonly redness and irritation where it is applied). Breast development may occur in pediatric patients using the cream. The vaginal ring may be expelled or cause intestinal obstruction, vaginal erosion or ulcers, and toxic shock syndrome; however, these are rare side effects. Generally, estradiol side effects are similar in all forms. A healthcare professional will work with you to find the best form of estradiol for you.

How long do estradiol side effects last?

The most common side effects of estradiol hormone replacement therapy are bloating, nausea, indigestion, headaches, vaginal bleeding, breast tenderness/swelling, leg cramps, and fluid retention. These side effects are usually temporary and normally resolve in a few weeks once your body adjusts to estradiol. It may take up to three months before you receive estradiol’s full benefits, so it’s important to take it as prescribed by your doctor. In many women who use estradiol, irregular vagina bleeding may occur. Talk to your healthcare provider if this happens. When taken long-term, estradiol may raise your risk of heart attack, stroke, blood clots, and cancer of the breast, uterus, or ovaries .

Estradiol contraindications and warnings

Abuse and dependence

Most women stay on estradiol for less than two years. While stopping the medication does not cause withdrawal symptoms, it may cause menopausal symptoms to return. Talk with your healthcare provider before stopping estradiol.

Overdose

If an overdose is suspected, contact your local poison control center or seek emergency medical attention immediately. Taking too much medication, in the wrong way, or by a person it was not prescribed for may be dangerous. Side effects of overdose include breast tenderness, drowsiness, nausea, vomiting, fluid retention, headache, discolored urine, a rash on the skin, changes in mood, fatigue, or excessive vaginal bleeding that may begin two to seven days after the overdose. Maximum dosage is as follows for menopausal symptoms, but the actual dosage will vary based on the condition being treated:

  • Oral: 2 mg per day, three weeks on and one week off
  • Patch: 0.1 mg per day given in a patch that is put on once or twice a week
  • Topical gel: 1 mg per day
  • Vaginal cream: 400 mcg, usually tapered down to 100 mcg, taken for part of each month
  • Vaginal ring : One ring every 90 days

Restrictions

You should not take estradiol if any of the following apply to you:

  • Estradiol allergy
  • Unusual vaginal bleeding
  • Blood clots in the past
  • Liver disease
  • A history of breast cancer
  • An estrogen-dependent cancer
  • Pregnancy
  • Breastfeeding (estradiol may decrease breast milk production)
  • Blood conditions that put you at risk for clots

Caution should be used when taking estradiol if any of the following apply to you:

  • Older than 65
  • Kidney disease
  • Heart disease
  • Risk of vascular disease
  • High blood pressure
  • Diabetes
  • You are a smoker
  • High cholesterol or hypertriglyceridemia, a high level of fat in the blood
  • Gallbladder disease
  • A history of jaundice
  • Obesity
  • You have had surgery recently or have been immobilized for a prolonged period of time
  • Hypothyroidism
  • Sensitivity to fluid retention
  • Low blood calcium
  • Endometriosis
  • Migraines
  • Seizure disorder
  • Involuntary movement disorder (chorea)
  • Asthma
  • Lupus
  • Porphyria
  • Liver hemangioma (a benign tumor)
  • Hereditary angioedema, a rare disorder that causes swelling in the body

Estradiol interactions

If you are taking a blood thinner, be sure to let your doctor know, as adverse effects may occur. The following prescription drugs should be avoided when taking estradiol:

  • Alosetron
  • Anastrozole
  • Bendamustine
  • Calaspargase
  • Exemestane
  • Letrozole
  • Pegaspargase
  • Pirfenidone
  • Tizanidine
  • Tranexamic acid

Many other drugs and supplements can interact with estradiol, so be sure to tell your healthcare provider about all medications you are taking, including over-the-counter and prescribed medications, vitamins, and supplements.

If you are taking estradiol, it’s important that you do not smoke or use tobacco products. Smoking combined with estradiol can increase your risk of blood clots, stroke, high blood pressure, and heart attack.

Avoid grapefruit and products containing grapefruit because they may significantly raise estradiol levels in the body.

Consult with your healthcare professional about drinking alcohol . Some studies have shown it increases levels of estrogen, contributing to breast cancer.

How to avoid estradiol side effects

  1. Be sure you take estradiol exactly as prescribed and according to the drug information contained in the package insert. How often you take estradiol will depend on the form and your individual circumstances.
  2. To avoid an upset stomach, you can take the oral form of estradiol with food or shortly after eating; take it at the same time each day.
  3. If you have been prescribed an extended-release version of estradiol, do not crush or chew the medication; swallow it whole.
  4. If you are using the gel form of estradiol, you can apply it at any time of the day, but be sure to do so at the same time each day to minimize side effects.
  5. If you miss a dose and it’s more than 12 hours before your next dose, take the missed dose right away. Otherwise, skip the dose and wait until it is time to take your next one.
  6. Take the minimum effective dose of estradiol. Your healthcare provider will monitor your progress every three to six months.
  7. Because there may be an increased risk of breast cancer when taking the medication for prolonged periods of time, be sure to perform a monthly breast self-exam and stick to a yearly mammogram schedule.
  8. Tell your healthcare provider about any persistent or unusual vaginal bleeding. You may need additional tests to find out the cause. You may also be given an additional hormone called a progestin to take together with estradiol.
  9. Estradiol treatment is generally considered safe for a period of five years or less.
  10. Treatment should begin before age 60 and less than 10 years after the onset of menopause.

Estradiol Oral Tablets

Medically reviewed by Drugs.com. Last updated on Oct 31, 2022.

Warning

  • Estrogens may raise the chance of uterine cancer. Progestins may lower this chance. A warning sign for cancer of the uterus is vaginal bleeding. Report any vaginal bleeding to the doctor.
  • Do not use estrogens to prevent heart disease or dementia. Oral estrogen has been shown to raise the risk of heart attack, a stroke, breast cancer, ovarian cancer, a blood clot, or dementia. It is not known if these effects are seen with other forms of estrogens. If you have questions, talk with the doctor.
  • Use estrogens with or without progestin for the shortest time needed at the lowest useful dose.

Uses of Estradiol Oral Tablets:

  • It is used to put off soft, brittle bones (osteoporosis) in women after change of life.
  • It is used to prevent or lower the signs of the change of life (menopause).
  • It is used to add estrogen to the body when the ovaries have been taken out or do not work the right way.
  • Rarely, it is used to treat breast or prostate cancers.
  • It may be given to you for other reasons. Talk with the doctor.

What do I need to tell my doctor BEFORE I take Estradiol Oral Tablets?

  • If you are allergic to this medicine (estradiol oral tablets); any part of this medicine (estradiol oral tablets); or any other drugs, foods, or substances. Tell your doctor about the allergy and what signs you had.
  • If you have ever had a very bad or life-threatening reaction called angioedema. Signs may be swelling of the hands, face, lips, eyes, tongue, or throat; trouble breathing; trouble swallowing; unusual hoarseness.
  • If you have had any of these health problems: Bleeding disorder, blood clots, a higher risk of having a blood clot, breast cancer, liver problems or liver tumor, heart attack, stroke, or a tumor where estrogen makes it grow.
  • If you have eyesight problems like loss of eyesight from blood vessel problems in the eye.
  • If you have thickening of the endometrium (lining of the uterus).
  • If you have unexplained vaginal bleeding.
  • If you are pregnant or may be pregnant. Do not take this medicine (estradiol oral tablets) if you are pregnant.

This is not a list of all drugs or health problems that interact with this medicine (estradiol oral tablets).

Tell your doctor and pharmacist about all of your drugs (prescription or OTC, natural products, vitamins) and health problems. You must check to make sure that it is safe for you to take this medicine (estradiol oral tablets) with all of your drugs and health problems. Do not start, stop, or change the dose of any drug without checking with your doctor.

What are some things I need to know or do while I take Estradiol Oral Tablets?

  • Tell all of your health care providers that you take this medicine (estradiol oral tablets). This includes your doctors, nurses, pharmacists, and dentists.
  • This medicine may raise the chance of blood clots, a stroke, or a heart attack. Talk with the doctor.
  • Talk with your doctor if you will need to be still for long periods of time like long trips, bedrest after surgery, or illness. Not moving for long periods may raise your chance of blood clots.
  • Call your doctor right away if you have signs of a blood clot like chest pain or pressure; coughing up blood; shortness of breath; swelling, warmth, numbness, change of color, or pain in a leg or arm; or trouble speaking or swallowing.
  • If you are allergic to tartrazine, talk with your doctor. Some products have tartrazine.
  • If you have high blood sugar (diabetes), you will need to watch your blood sugar closely.
  • High blood pressure has happened with drugs like this one. Have your blood pressure checked as you have been told by your doctor.
  • Have blood work checked as you have been told by the doctor. Talk with the doctor.
  • Have a bone density test as you have been told by your doctor. Talk with your doctor.
  • Be sure to have regular breast exams and gynecology check-ups. You will also need to do breast self-exams as you have been told.
  • High calcium levels have happened with drugs like this one in some people with cancer. Call your doctor right away if you have signs of high calcium levels like weakness, confusion, feeling tired, headache, upset stomach or throwing up, constipation, or bone pain.
  • High triglyceride levels have happened with this medicine (estradiol oral tablets). Tell your doctor if you have ever had high triglyceride levels.
  • This medicine may cause dark patches of skin on your face. Avoid sun, sunlamps, and tanning beds. Use sunscreen and wear clothing and eyewear that protects you from the sun.
  • This medicine may affect certain lab tests. Tell all of your health care providers and lab workers that you take this medicine (estradiol oral tablets).
  • Do not smoke. Smoking raises the chance of heart disease. Talk with your doctor.
  • Limit your drinking of alcohol.
  • If you drink grapefruit juice or eat grapefruit often, talk with your doctor.
  • This medicine works best when used with calcium/vitamin D and weight-bearing workouts like walking or PT (physical therapy).
  • Follow the diet and workout plan that your doctor told you about.
  • This medicine may affect growth in children and teens in some cases. They may need regular growth checks. Talk with the doctor.
  • If you are 65 or older, use this medicine (estradiol oral tablets) with care. You could have more side effects.
  • Tell your doctor if you are breast-feeding. You will need to talk about any risks to your baby.

How is this medicine (Estradiol Oral Tablets) best taken?

Use this medicine (estradiol oral tablets) as ordered by your doctor. Read all information given to you. Follow all instructions closely.

  • Take this medicine (estradiol oral tablets) at the same time of day.
  • There may be days when you will not take this medicine (estradiol oral tablets).
  • Take with or without food. Take with food if it causes an upset stomach.

What do I do if I miss a dose?

  • Take a missed dose as soon as you think about it.
  • If it is close to the time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your normal time.
  • Do not take 2 doses at the same time or extra doses.

What are some side effects that I need to call my doctor about right away?

WARNING/CAUTION: Even though it may be rare, some people may have very bad and sometimes deadly side effects when taking a drug. Tell your doctor or get medical help right away if you have any of the following signs or symptoms that may be related to a very bad side effect:

  • Signs of an allergic reaction, like rash; hives; itching; red, swollen, blistered, or peeling skin with or without fever; wheezing; tightness in the chest or throat; trouble breathing, swallowing, or talking; unusual hoarseness; or swelling of the mouth, face, lips, tongue, or throat.
  • Signs of liver problems like dark urine, feeling tired, not hungry, upset stomach or stomach pain, light-colored stools, throwing up, or yellow skin or eyes.
  • Signs of gallbladder problems like pain in the upper right belly area, right shoulder area, or between the shoulder blades; yellow skin or eyes; fever with chills; bloating; or very upset stomach or throwing up.
  • Signs of a pancreas problem (pancreatitis) like very bad stomach pain, very bad back pain, or very bad upset stomach or throwing up.
  • Signs of high blood pressure like very bad headache or dizziness, passing out, or change in eyesight.
  • Weakness on 1 side of the body, trouble speaking or thinking, change in balance, drooping on one side of the face, or blurred eyesight.
  • Eyesight changes or loss, bulging eyes, or change in how contact lenses feel.
  • A lump in the breast, breast pain or soreness, or nipple discharge.
  • Vaginal itching or discharge.
  • Vaginal bleeding that is not normal.
  • Depression or other mood changes.
  • Memory problems or loss.
  • Fever.
  • Not able to pass urine or change in how much urine is passed.
  • Pain when passing urine.
  • Swelling.

What are some other side effects of Estradiol Oral Tablets?

All drugs may cause side effects. However, many people have no side effects or only have minor side effects. Call your doctor or get medical help if any of these side effects or any other side effects bother you or do not go away:

  • Headache.
  • Hair loss.
  • Upset stomach or throwing up.
  • Constipation.
  • Stomach cramps.
  • Bloating.
  • Enlarged breasts.
  • Tender breasts.
  • Vaginal bleeding or spotting.
  • Painful periods.
  • Signs of a common cold.
  • Nose or throat irritation.
  • Weight gain or loss.
  • Joint pain.
  • Leg cramps.
  • Change in sex interest.

These are not all of the side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, call your doctor. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects.

You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-332-1088. You may also report side effects at https://www.fda.gov/medwatch.

If OVERDOSE is suspected:

If you think there has been an overdose, call your poison control center or get medical care right away. Be ready to tell or show what was taken, how much, and when it happened.

How do I store and/or throw out Estradiol Oral Tablets?

  • Store at room temperature in a dry place. Do not store in a bathroom.
  • Keep all drugs in a safe place. Keep all drugs out of the reach of children and pets.
  • Throw away unused or expired drugs. Do not flush down a toilet or pour down a drain unless you are told to do so. Check with your pharmacist if you have questions about the best way to throw out drugs. There may be drug take-back programs in your area.

Consumer Information Use and Disclaimer

  • If your symptoms or health problems do not get better or if they become worse, call your doctor.
  • Do not share your drugs with others and do not take anyone else’s drugs.
  • Some drugs may have another patient information leaflet. Check with your pharmacist. If you have any questions about this medicine (estradiol oral tablets), please talk with your doctor, nurse, pharmacist, or other health care provider.
  • If you think there has been an overdose, call your poison control center or get medical care right away. Be ready to tell or show what was taken, how much, and when it happened.

More about estradiol

  • Check interactions
  • Compare alternatives
  • Pricing & coupons
  • Reviews (524)
  • Drug images
  • Side effects
  • Dosage information
  • Patient tips
  • During pregnancy
  • Support group
  • Drug class: estrogens
  • Breastfeeding

Patient resources

  • Drug Information
  • Estradiol injection
  • Estradiol topical
  • Estradiol transdermal skin patch
  • Estradiol vaginal

Other brands

Professional resources

Related treatment guides

  • Atrophic Vaginitis
  • Gender Affirming Hormone Therapy
  • Atrophic Urethritis
  • Breast Cancer, Palliative

Further information

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.